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The First Month: Learning the Routine

Your new employee may feel “new” for some time, but with some guidance, they will grow to be more comfortable, confident and productive.

During the first month, have one-on-one check-ins at least weekly to clarify questions, address concerns and monitor progress. Your feedback can have a considerable impact on your new employee’s self-perception and sense of achievement.


Policies, Procedure and Paperwork

  • Complete any open items on New Employee Checklist (UC Davis) / New Employee Checklist (UC Davis Health) and return to Human Resources. Retain copy in personnel file.
  • Verify new employee has signed up for benefits prior to enrollment deadline.
    • Period of initial eligibility is 30 days after date of hire
  • Ensure reviews of policies and procedures scheduled for new employee’s first week have been done.
  • Encourage new employee to check the campus online directory to make sure his/her name and contact information is correct.
  • Encourage new employee to check first paycheck information to ensure it reflects benefit plan choices, payroll deductions and personal information correctly.

Training and Development


Performance Management

  • Be available to answer your new employee’s questions.
  • Set assignments and timelines.
  • Provide detailed instructions and resources for completing tasks and assignments.
  • Hold weekly meetings to review performance expectations and initial performance regarding goals and expected deliverables.
  • Ask for feedback about how things are going and if your new employee is getting the necessary support from you and others to become proficient.
  • Increase the complexity and scope of work to assess your new employee’s ability to perform the full range of duties within the position.
  • Contact Human Resources if there are any significant performance concerns.

 THE FIRST SIX MONTHS: MASTERING THE ROLE >