ASAP Frequently Asked Questions

Who can use the services?
All UC Davis staff and faculty members, and their dependents or domestic partners, can use the service. We see individuals, couples, families, work groups or entire departments, depending upon your needs.
Are your services confidential?
Yes, no information about your participation is released to anyone without your written consent, except when legally mandated. Exceptions to confidentiality are provided by law for serious matters like danger to self or others, or child/elder abuse, as outlined in our written consent to treatment form. No information from ASAP appears in any departmental, central, or personnel files.
How do I schedule an appointment at ASAP?
You can schedule an appointment by calling the ASAP office at (530) 752-2727, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. If you call after hours, please leave a message and we will return your call the next business day and arrange the first available appointment. You may also e-mail ASAP at slree@ucdavis.edu to set up your appointment.
What if someone is considering suicide?
We urge you to call us if you or someone you know is considering suicide. We will provide you with options for you unique situation. After business hours, please dial 911 or call Suicide Prevention at (530) 756-7542.
What kinds of problems are addressed at ASAP?
Our professional staff can address any personal or work related problems such as drugs and alcohol, couples or relationship issues, family problems, stress, and work difficulties.
Must an immediate family member be seen with the related staff or faculty member?
No, immediate family members may be seen on their own, or with the related staff/faculty member, at their discretion.
Does ASAP see students?
If the student is an employee and receives a paycheck from the UCD, we may see them. Generally, students receive services from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) located in North Hall on campus.
How long are appointments and how many appointments can I have?
Appointments are usually 50 minutes.  This is calculated per presenting problem or issue. Thus, an individual may return at a later date for further sessions if new problems or issues arise for them. If it is determined that the employee and/or family member might need longer term service, the ASAP professional will assist in referrals to private practitioners in the community.
Can I have release time for my appointments?
Yes, with your supervisor’s approval. If you do not wish to let anyone in your office know that you are coming to ASAP, you can state that you have a doctor’s appointment and would like to take sick leave. You can also arrange to attend appointments on your lunch hour. You do not need to use vacation or sick leave for a visit to ASAP. However, supervisors may require confirmation of an appointment.
What if I’m more comfortable speaking with a male/female counselor?
At ASAP we have both male and female counselors to provide the best match and atmosphere for whatever your needs are.
What happens at my first appointment?
You will meet with a counselor and after discussing your concerns, the counselor will assist you in developing a plan. The plan might include more sessions at ASAP and/or various campus resources, or a referral to a private provider in the community.
Can I receive services related to drug and/or alcohol issues?
Yes, drug and alcohol counseling is a large part of ASAP services. We offer assessment, treatment, referrals, and assistance in rehabilitation placement, as well as work re-entry support if necessary.
Does ASAP offer services in addition to individual sessions?
Yes, ASAP offers a series of noon time “brown bag” presentations in the fall and/or spring quarters, as well as biannual and  support groups. Additionally, ASAP offers a variety of departmental presentations, consultations and debriefings. Please call ASAP at (530) 752-2727 for more information.
Who works at ASAP?
The ASAP staff is comprised of a diverse team of mental health professionals and administrators, including: marriage and family therapists (MFTs); licensed clinical social workers (LCSWs); clinical psychologists; and counseling interns who have completed Masters or Doctoral level coursework and advanced to candidacy.